Packaging Pete Goes After Virgin Plastic

2012 Corporate Responsibility Report

Packaging Pete Goes After Virgin Plastic Pete Swaine, Director of Packaging Development “I always have several sizes and shapes of Seventh Generation plastic bottles spread across my work area but I’m never happy with everything I see. At the beginning of 2012, our company was already known as a leader for the high post-consumer recycled (PCR) content in our plastic bottles, with dozens at 100 percent PCR (less 1,158 2009 2009–2012 31% reduction in virgin plastic 797 2012 1,053 951 removed 361 metric tons! VIRGIN PLASTIC IN PACKAGING Virgin Plastic (Metric Tons), 2009–2012 colorant) while only 25 – 50 percent PCR is the norm across the industry. We had a tremendous amount to be proud of — but all I could see were the bottle caps. Ours were still entirely virgin plastic. “Our plastic caps are made from polypropylene, or #5 plastic, a sturdier plastic than the high density polyethylene (HDPE) liquid dish and laundry detergent bottles they stopper. The caps are colorless and I had been searching for a source of colorless recycled polypropylene for some time but the only available batches were colored. I always let our suppliers know my goals because they are such powerful allies in helping us push the envelope. Eventually, one of our suppliers located an adequate supply of colorless polypropylene for us. “The next challenge was to figure out how much recycled content we could put into the caps and still reach the correct melting point needed to form the caps properly. I wanted to go as high as we could. After experimenting, we were finally satisfied that 22  Seventh Generation, Inc. | FUTURE TENSE: Corporate Consciousness Report for 2012 Nurturing Nature


2012 Corporate Responsibility Report
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